Join a Virtual Book Club

young woman reading on a tabletIt’s the perfect time to join a book club – from home. The Classics Made Modern book group meets on Zoom and connects together in a Facebook group! Flexibility for your changing schedule- for each title, we have two Zoom discussions, Tuesday evening or Wednesday afternoon.

Here are the basics:

  • We’ll read and discuss a classic novel or classic short stories together.
  • All of the books are available freely in the public domain and readily available in various ebook and audiobook formats.
  • If you haven’t ever read a classic that wasn’t assigned – we’re going to make this fun. If you love reading but are looking for something a bit different – try one of these titles!
  • Background information on each title is available via email or through the Facebook group.
  • Follow along in the library’s Facebook group for this discussion as we share quotes, memes, historical context, modern takes, factoids about the author’s personal life, strong opinions about the movie versions and trivia! Of course we will also interact, ask questions and discuss our thoughts about the book in the comments
  • We meet on Tuesday evenings from 7-8 pm and the next day on Wednesday afternoons from 2-3 pm. We’ll meet in a Zoom video chat to discuss the book “face-to-face”! Attend either or both sessions, whatever works for you! To sign up for the Zoom discussions, or if you have any questions – Email classicsmodern@tscpl.org.

Upcoming Book Discussion Schedule

The Night Watchman by Louise Erdrich was published in 2020 and set in the 1950s on the Turtle Mountain Reservation.The novel was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 2021. The novel is based on the extraordinary life of Erdrich’s grandfather who worked as a night watchman and carried the fight against Native dispossession from rural North Dakota all the way to Washington, D.C., this powerful novel explores themes of love and death with lightness and gravity and unfolds with the elegant prose, sly humor, and depth of feeling of a master craftsman.

Read on Hoopla, listen on Hoopla, check out the book from the library in other formats.

  • Tuesday, September 27, 2022 7-8 pm
  • Wednesday, September 28, 2022 2-3 pm

Lolly Willowes; or, The Loving Hunstman by Sylvia Townsend Warner Lolly Willowes, always so gentle and accommodating, suddenly announces that she is moving, alone, to the countryside. To her overbearing family in London, it is a disturbing and inexplicable act of defiance. But Lolly will not be swayed, and in the depths of the English countryside she gradually discovers not only freedom and independence, but also, unexpectedly, her true vocation. The book was first published in 1926 and described as an early feminist classic.

Read on Hoopla, listen on Hoopla, check out the book from the library in other formats.

  • Tuesday, October 25, 2022 7-8 pm
  • Wednesday, October 26, 2-3 pm

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson, published in 1886, introduced the everyday language of “Jekyll and Hyde” in a suspenseful story. Gabriel Utterson is intrigued by the sinister figure of Mr. Hyde, and the latter’s strange relationship with Utterson’s good friend, Dr. Jekyll. When Mr. Hyde beats a Member of Parliament to death, Gabriel Utterson tries to get to the bottom of the mystery and eventually discovers Dr. Jekyll’s dark secret.

Read on Hoopla or Project Gutenberg, listen on Hoopla (about 3 hours). Watch the 2002 film adaptation starring Jack Palance, available on Hoopla. Check out the book from the library.

  • Tuesday, November 8, 2022 7-8 pm
  • Wednesday, November 9, 2022 2-3 pm

My Antonia by Willa Cather was published in 1918 and is the third book in the author’s “Great Plains Trilogy” or “Prairie Trilogy” although the books can be read independently.Orphaned at the age of 10, Jim Burden moves to Nebraska to live with his grandparents. There he meets Ántonia Shimerda, the daughter of an immigrant family from Bohemia, who have come to carve out a life for themselves in the harsh and bountiful Nebraskan landscape. At the urging of her father, Jim teaches Ántonia English and together they share adventures that will bind them throughout their lives, despite the vicissitudes of time and fate, and years of separation. 

Read on Hoopla or Project Gutenberg, listen on Hoopla (about 8.5 hours). Check out the book in several other formats from the library.

  • Tuesday December 6, 2022 7-8 pm
  • Wednesday December 7, 2022 2-3 pm

Zoom links available here or email classicsmodern@tscpl.org.

 

YOU are invited to this book group

We’ve got options to make this work for everyone!

  • If you aren’t sure about this whole reading classics idea – check it out to see if any of these books or stories interest you!

Archive of Previous Titles

This book discussion group began in April 2020. Here’s what we have already read together:

  1. Wednesday April 22, 2020, 2-3 pm: Short Story Starters: The Masque of the Red Death by Edgar Allan Poe and The Yellow Wallpaperby Charlotte Perkins Gilman
  2. Wednesday April 29, 2020, 2-3 pm: Sense and Sensibility– Jane Austen
  3. Wednesday May 13, 2020, 2-3 pm: Treasure Island – Robert Louis Stevenson
  4. Wednesday May 27, 2020, 2-3 pm: The Picture of Dorian Gray – Oscar Wilde
  5. Tuesday, June 9th, 2020, 7-8 pm: The Mysterious Affair at Styles – Agatha Christie
    Wednesday, June 10th, 2020,2-3 pm
  6. Tuesday, June 23, 2020, 7-8 pm: The Time Machine by H. G. Wells
    Wednesday, June 24, 2020, 2-3 pm
  7. Tuesday, July 7, 2020, 7-8 pm: The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle
    Wednesday, July 8, 2020, 2-3 pm
  8. Tuesday, July 21, 2020, 7-8 pm: Persuasion by Jane Austen
    Wednesday, July 22, 2020, 2-3 pm
  9. Tuesday, August 4, 2020, 7-8 pm:”Rip Van Winkle” by Washington Irving
    Wednesday, August 5, 2020, 2-3 pm
  10. Tuesday, August 18, 2020, 7-8 pm: The Souls of Black Folk by W. E. B. Du Bois
    Wednesday, August 19, 2020, 2-3 pm
  11. Tuesday, September 1, 2020, 7-8 pm:The Inimitable Jeevesby P. G. Wodehouse  (we will pick several stories to focus on)
    Wednesday, September 2, 2020, 2-3 pm
  12. Tuesday, September 15, 2020, 7-8 pm: Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
    Wednesday, September 16, 2020, 2-3 pm:
  13. Grimms’ Fairy Tales by Jacob Grimm and Wilhelm Grimm
    • Tuesday, September 29, 2020, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, September 30, 2020, 2-3 pm
  14. Two classic Mark Twain short stories: The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County and The Man Who Corrupted Hadleyburg
    • Tuesday, October 13, 2020, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, October 14, 2020, 2-3 pm
  15. Whose Body? A Lord Peter Wimsey Novel by Dorothy L. Sayers: a 1923 mystery novel about a nobleman who investigates as a hobby
    • Tuesday, October 27, 2020, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, October 28, 2020, 2-3 pm
  16. The Innocence of Father Brown by G. K. Chesterton, focusing on the first four stories from 1911
    • Tuesday, November 10, 2020, 7-8 pm,
    • Wednesday, November 11, 2020, 2-3 pm
  17. The Importance of Being Earnest: A Trivial Comedy for Serious People by Oscar Wilde: an 1985 play and satire of Victorian ways
    • Tuesday, November 24, 2020, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, November 25, 2020, 2-3 pm
  18. “Bernice Bobs her Hair” by F. Scott Fitzgerald from the short story collection Flappers and Philosophers along with  “The Ice Palace,” “Head and Shoulders,” and “The Offshore Pirate.”
    • Tuesday, December 8, 2020, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, December 9, 2020, 2-3 pm
  19. The Four Million, by O. Henry including “The Cop and the Anthem” and “The Gift of the Magi”
    • Tuesday, December 22, 2020, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, December 23, 2020, 2-3 pm
  20. Short stories from Willa Cather’s 1920 collection Youth and the Bright Medusa including “Paul’s Case,” “The Sculptor’s Funeral,” and “A Death in the Desert”
    • Tuesday, January 5, 2021, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, January 6, 2021, 2-3 pm
  21. Short stories from Twice Told Tales by Nathaniel Hawthorne, originally issued in 1837 including “The Gentle Boy,” “Dr. Heidegger’s Experiment,” “The Great Carbuncle,” and “Lady Eleanore’s Mantle”
    • Tuesday, January 19, 2021, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, January 20, 2021, 2-3 pm
  22. The Machine Stops by E. M. Forster
    • Tuesday, February 2, 2021, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, February 3, 2021, 2-3 pm
    • Mrs. Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
      • Tuesday, February 16, 2021, 7-8 pm
      • Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 2-3 pm
  23. The Fairy Tales of Oscar Wilde, specifically The Happy Prince, The Nightingale And the Rose, The Selfish Giant, The Devoted Friend, The Remarkable Rocket. Ebook and audiobook available from Hoopla.
    • Tuesday, March 2, 2021, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, March 3, 2021, 2-3 pm
  24. Arrowsmith by Sinclair Lewis, discussing over two sessions. For the March 16/17 session, we will concentrate discussion on Chapters 1-25, and at the March 30/31 sessions we will discuss the entire novel concentrating on Chapters 26-30. Checkout the ebook or audiobook from Hoopla. Read the ebook from Project Gutenberg.
    • Tuesday, March 16, 2021, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, March 17, 2021, 2-3 pm
    • Tuesday, March 30, 2021, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, March 31, 2021, 2-3 pm
  25. “When Robot and Crow Saved East St. Louis” by Annalee Newitz. This Sturgeon Award-winning short story, about a disease surveillance robot whose social programming gets put to the test, originally appeared on Slate, December 19, 2018, and was later anthologized in The Best American Science Fiction and Fantasy 2019 edited by Carmen Maria Machado and John Joseph Adams and Future Tense Fiction: Stories of Tomorrow (2019) from Unnamed Press. Read the story on Slate’s website. A text and audio version are available from Escape Pod. This short story also appears in two print collections in the library’s collection.
    • Tuesday, April 13, 2021, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, April 14, 2021, 2-3 pm
  26. The Red House Mystery by A. A. Milne is a “locked room” whodunnit published in 1922. Check out the ebook or audiobook from Hoopla.  Download the ebook from Project Gutenberg. Check out the book from the library collection. 
    • Tuesday, April 27, 2021, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, April 28, 2021, 2-3 pm
  27. House of Mirth by Edith Wharton, published in 1905, reflects her intimate knowledge of the elitist New York society into which she was born and her judgment of that society.  This book is scheduled for reading across two sessions. We will focus on reading and discussing the first half, Book One, at the May 11/12 discussions and then discuss the entire book, focusing on the second half, Book Two, at the May 25/26 discussions. Check out the ebook or audiobook from Hoopla.  Download the ebook from Project Gutenberg. Check out the book from the library collection. 
    • Tuesday, May 11, 2021, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, May 12, 2021, 2-3 pm
    •  Tuesday, May 25, 2021, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, May 26, 2021, 2-3 pm
  28. Short Stories by Katherine Mansfield, specifically focusing on these four stories:
    “The Doll’s House” which shows how rigid social values and class consciousness are handed down from one generation to another.
    “The Daughters of the Late Colonel” which the author described as ‘the only story that satisfies me to any extent.’
    “The Garden Party” is considered Katherine Mansfield’s finest piece of short fiction. The story centers on Laura Sheridan’s response to the accidental death of a neighborhood workman.
    “Miss Brill,” Katherine Mansfield’s short story about a woman’s Sunday outing to a park. The story’s enduring popularity is due in part to its use of a stream-of-consciousness narrative in which Miss Brill’s character is revealed through her thoughts about others as she watches a crowd from a park bench.
    Check out the ebook or audiobook from Hoopla.  Download the ebook from Project Gutenberg. Check out the book from the library collection. 

    • Tuesday, June 8, 2021, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, June 9, 2021, 2-3 pm
  29. Little Fuzzyby H. Beam Piper, was nominated for the 1963 Hugo Award for Best Novel. A prospector on the planet Zarathustra discovers intelligent small furry creatures. If they are sapient the planet will be declared a protected zone and the company that is developing the planet commercially will lose their exclusive rights to the resources. In 2011, John Scalzi published Fuzzy Nation, which he described as a “reboot” of Piper’s original. Check out the ebook from Hoopla.  Download the ebook from Project Gutenberg.  Download the audiobook from Librivox.
    • Tuesday, June 22, 2021, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, June 23, 2021, 2-3 pm
  30. Read One of Oursby Willa Cather, a novel of youth, the prairie, influenza, and war which won the Pulitzer Prize in 1923. This story of a Nebraska farm boy who dies fighting in France in World War I was a best-seller in its time. Cather based the plot on letters written by a cousin who had died in World War I.  This book is scheduled for reading across two sessions.
    Tuesday, July 6, 2021, 7-8 pm

      • Wednesday, July 7, 2021, 2-3 pm
      • Tuesday, July 20, 2021, 7-8 pm
      • Wednesday, July 21, 2021, 2-3 pm
  31. The Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald is an influential Scottish children’s fantasy novel from 1872. Princess Irene is given a magical ring; Curdie is a boy who works in the mines; the goblins who live underground intend to kidnap Irene and marry her off to the goblin prince. The story begins as a normal fairytale but becomes stranger; it’s notable for bravery and symbolism. Check out the ebook or audiobook from Hoopla. Download the ebook from Project Gutenberg. Check out the book or audiobook from the library collection. 
    • Tuesday, August 3, 2021 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, August 4, 2021 2-3 pm
  32. The Mystery of the Yellow Room by Gaston Leroux is a 1908 French mystery crime novel, from the author of The Phantom of the Opera. It is the first novel starring fictional detective Joseph Rouletabille, and concerns a complex and seemingly impossible crime in which the criminal appears to disappear from a locked room. Agatha Christie admired the novel and in her early years said she would like to try writing such a book. Check out the ebook or audiobook from Hoopla. Download the ebook from Project Gutenberg.
    • Tuesday, August 17, 2021, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, August 18, 2021, 2-3 pm
  33. A Lady’s Life in the Rocky Mountains is a travel book, by Isabella L. Bird, describing her 1873 trip to the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. The book is a compilation of letters that Isabella Bird wrote to her sister, and relates the many hardships of the great western frontier, the unique characters she meets, and the incredible natural world she found in the newly settled western territories. Check out the ebook from Hoopla. Download the ebook from Project Gutenberg. Check out the book from the library’s collection. Audiobook versions are available including from librivox.
    • Tuesday, August 31, 2021, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, September 1, 2021, 2-3 pm
  34. The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man by James Weldon Johnson is novel published anonymously in 1912 in order to suggest authenticity and then issued again under Johnson’s name in 1927 as a fictional autobiography. The story explores the intricacies of racial identity through the eventful life of its mixed-race (and unnamed) narrator.
    Check out the ebook or audiobook from Hoopla. Download the ebook from Project Gutenberg. Check out the book from the library’s collection.

    • Tuesday, September 14, 2021, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, September 15, 2021, 2-3 pm
  35. The Admirable Crichton by J. M. Barrie is a 1902 comic stage play dealing with serious class issues that were controversial at the time, but not seriously questioning the status quo. In a classic satire about the changing fortunes of Crichton, the perfect butler, after an aristocratic family and their servants are shipwrecked on a deserted tropical island.
    Check out the ebook of the play from Hoopla. Download the ebook from Project Gutenberg. Audiobook versions are available online including from librivox.

    • Tuesday, September 28 2021, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, September 29, 2021, 2-3 pm
  36. A Modest Proposalby Jonathan Swift is subtitled (For preventing the Children of Poor People From being a Burthen to Their Parents or Country, and For making them Beneficial to the Publick). This Juvenalian satirical essay was written and published anonymously by Swift in 1729. Swift’s essay is widely held to be one of the greatest examples of sustained irony in the history of the English language.  Check out the ebook or audiobook from Hoopla. Download the ebook from Project Gutenberg.
    • Tuesday, October 12, 2021, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, October 13, 2021, 2-3 pm
  37. Read selections from Edgar Allen Poe, specifically two short stories: “The Tell-Tale Hear”t and “The Cask of Amontillado”, and one narrative poem, “The Raven”.  
    Written in 1843, “The Tell-Tale Heart” is a dark and eerie tale of a man’s unhealthy obsession that leads him to commit murder. Will his paranoia get him caught?
    Written in 1846, “The Cask of Amontillado” is a powerful tale of revenge and is considered universally to be one of Poe’s best short stories. Montresor, the sinister narrator of this tale, pledges revenge upon Fortunato for an insult. Montresor intends to seek vengeance in support of his family motto: “Nemo me impune laces sit.” (No one assails me with impunity.)
    Perhaps Poe’s most famous work, The Raven was first published in 1845 in the New York Evening Mirror. Known for its tight rhymes, rhythm, and the repetitive response given by the eponymous raven-Nevermore-the poem focuses on that raven and a forlorn man who is distraught over his lost lover, Lenore.
    All three selections are widely available and frequently adapted and referenced in popular culture. Check out the ebook or audiobook from Hoopla. Download the ebook including the stories from Project Gutenberg. Check out materials by or about Edgar Allen Poe from the library collection. 

    • Tuesday, October 26, 2021, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, October 27, 2021, 2-3 pm
  38. The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran is a book of twenty six simple prose fables. This best-known work from the Lebanese-American poet and writer was published in 1923 and has become a token of free thought and intellectual betterment across many generations of readers. Each fable examines a different facet of the human experience. Gibran’s works, written in both Arabic and English, are full of lyrical outpourings and express his deeply religious and mystical nature.  Check out the ebook or audiobook from Hoopla. Download the ebook from Project Gutenberg. Check out the book or audiobook from the library collection. 
    • Tuesday, November 9, 2021, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, November 10, 2021, 2-3 pm
  39. Agnes Grey by Anne Bronte is an autobiographical novel with strong parallels between its events and Anne Bronte’s own life as a governess. Written when women-and workers generally-had few rights in England, Agnes Grey exposes the brutal inequities of the rigid class system in mid-nineteenth-century Britain. After a reversal of fortunes in her middle-class home, Agnes begins working as a governess. She is teaching children of rich families, but she is unprepared for the harsh reality of a governess’s life.
    NOTE: Classics Made Modern is NOT meeting November 23/24 to give everyone more time to read this slightly longer selection.
    Check out the ebook or audiobook from Hoopla. Download the ebook from Project Gutenberg. Check out the book or audiobook from the library collection. 

    • Tuesday, December 7, 2021, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, December 8, 2021, 2-3 p
  40. Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw was first presented on stage to the public in 1912. Professor of phonetics Henry Higgins makes a bet that he can train a bedraggled Cockney flower girl, Eliza Doolittle, to pass for a duchess at an ambassador’s garden party. The play is a sharp lampoon of the rigid British class system of the day and a commentary on women’s independence. Shaw’s play has been adapted numerous times, most notably as the musical My Fair Lady.
    Check out the ebook or audiobook from Hoopla. Download the ebook from Project Gutenberg. Check out the book or audiobook or movie adaptation from the library collection. 

    • Tuesday, December 21, 2021, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, December 22, 2021, 2-3 pm
  41.  Anton Chekhov’s “The Lady With the Dog” and “The Bet” are two of the Russian author’s most popular short stories. “The Bet” asks: Would you go into voluntary solitary confinement for 15 years in order to get rich? “The Lady With the Dog” introduces Dmitri Dmitritch Gurov, who has grown tired of the Yalta seaside. He is looking for a more interesting way to pass his vacation when a woman with a Pomeranian catches his eye.  Widely recognized as one of literature’s sharpest observers of human nature, Anton Chekhov has influenced generations of writers. Check out the ebook or audiobook from Hoopla: The Lady With the Dog and The Bet. Download the stories in ebook collections from Project Gutenberg: The Lady With the Dog and The Bet.
    • Tuesday, January 4, 2022, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, January 5, 2022, 2-3 pm

     

  42. Herman Melville’s “Bartleby, the Scrivener” and Ambrose Bierce’s “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” are two oft-studies example of shorter works.
    Ambrose Bierce (1842 – 1914) was an American author and Civil War veteran. An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge is a short story set during the American Civil War, and is considered Bierce’s finest work. Captured during the American Civil War, a would-be saboteur clings to a chance to escape the hangman’s noose and return to his family.
    Herman Melville delivers a simple story about a man who follows his own path. He chooses not to engage with work or society as a whole. It’s an examination of passive resistance in a modern world fueled by compliance and consumerism. Bartleby is a newly hired scrivener who initially produces great work but slowly reduces his output, declining assignments and responding with: “I would prefer not to.” Despite his poor performance, his boss struggles to reprimand the eccentric character.
    Check out the ebook or audiobook from Hoopla: “Bartleby, The Scrivener”  and “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge”. Download the ebook from Project Gutenberg: “Bartleby, The Scrivener”  and “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge

      • Tuesday, January 18, 2022, 7-8 pm
      • Wednesday, January 19, 2022, 2-3 pm
  43. The Circular Staircase by Mary Roberts Rinehart is the first novel by American’s queen of crime, published in 1908. Wealthy, middle-aged spinster Rachel Innes is persuaded by her niece Gertrude and nephew Halsey to take a house in the country for the summer. Rachel is unaware that the house hides a sinister secret, and soon unexplained happenings and murder follow. The Circular Staircase is perhaps Mary Roberts Rinehart’s most famous story. The tale mixes bone-chilling suspense and romance with good humor to produce an absorbing and entertaining mystery. Check out the ebook or audiobook from Hoopla. Download the ebook from Project Gutenberg.
    • Tuesday, February 15, 2022, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, February 16, 2022, 2-3 pm
  44. Riders of the Purple Sage by Zane Grey is a Western novel first published in 1912. Considered by scholars to have played a significant role in shaping the formula of the popular Western genre, the novel has been called “the most popular western novel of all time.” Jane Withersteen is a wealthy, contented rancher in the Mormon village of Cottonwoods, until the churchmen decree she must marry the arrogant Elder Tull. When she refuses, Tull and his band turn nasty, using the valley’s water as his leverage. That’s when Lassiter rides into town, determined to teach Tull and his mob a lesson. Check out the ebook or audiobook from Hoopla. Download the ebook from Project Gutenberg. Check out the book or audiobook from the library collection. 

    • Tuesday, March 15, 2022, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, March 16, 2022, 2-3 pm

    45. Winnie-the-Pooh by A. A. Milne enters the public domain in 2022. Since 1926, Winnie-the-Pooh and his friends–Piglet, Owl, Tigger, and the ever doleful Eeyore–have endured as the unforgettable creations of A.A. Milne, who wrote this book of short stories for his son, Christopher Robin, and Ernest H. Shepard, the illustrator who lovingly gave Pooh and his companions shape. These characters and their stories are timeless treasures of childhood that continue to speak to all of us with the kind of freshness and heart that distinguishes true storytelling. Check out the ebook or audiobook from Hoopla. Download the ebook from Project Gutenberg. Check out the book or audiobook from the library collection. 

    •  Tuesday, April 12, 2022, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, April 13, 2022, 2-3 pm

    46. Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Seas by Jules Verne is regarded as one of the great adventure novels of all time, at once an enthralling underwater quest and a tale of isolating madness. In 1866, sightings of a legendary sea monster prompt a daring expedition out of New York City on a Navy frigate. Though they are fearless, nothing prepares the men for the “creature” itself-the Nautilus-a powerful, destructive submarine years ahead of its time. At the helm of the vessel is the brilliant Captain Nemo, who pulls the men deep into the wonders of the seas and the dark depths of his mind. Check out the ebook or audiobook from Hoopla. Download the ebook from Project Gutenberg. Check out the book or audiobook from the library collection. 

    • Tuesday, May 10, 2022, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, May 11, 2022, 2-3 pm

    47. The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway enters the public domain in 2022. This is Hemingway’s first novel, based on his own experiences, and remains a classic example of his spare but powerful writing style. A poignant look at the disillusionment and angst of the post-World War I generation, the novel introduces two of Hemingway’s most unforgettable characters: Jake Barnes and Lady Brett Ashley in the story of a group of American and English expatriates living in Paris who take an excursion to Pamplona, Spain. Check out the ebook or audiobook from Hoopla. Download the ebook from Project Gutenberg. Check out the book or audiobook from the library collection. 

    • Tuesday, June 7, 2022, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, June 8, 2022, 2-3 pm

    48. The Sheik by E.M. Hull is one of the most widely read novels of the 1920s, and forever fixed in the popular imagination in the film version starring the irresistible Rudolph Valentino. The Sheik is recognized as the immediate precursor to the modern romance novel. Diana Mayo is young, beautiful, wealthy-and independent. Bored by the eligible bachelors and endless parties of the English aristocracy, she arranges for a horseback trek through the Algerian desert. Two days into her adventure, Diana is kidnapped … what follows is a tale of mystery, power, and exotic love fulfilled. Check out the ebook from Hoopla or Overdrive/Libby. Download the ebook from Project Gutenberg. Download the audiobook from Librivox. View the 1921 silent film.

    • Tuesday, July 5, 2022, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, July 6, 2022, 2-3 pm

    49. The Girl of the Limberlost by Gene Stratton-Porter has captivated readers since its initial appearance in 1909. Rejected by her embittered mother and scorned by her classmates, Elnora Comstock seeks consolation in nature amid the wilds of eastern Indiana’s Limberlost Swamp. Elnora Comstock has served as a role model for successive generations of independent young readers. Check out the ebook or audiobook from Hoopla or Overdrive/Libby. Download the ebook from Project Gutenberg. Download the audiobook from Librivox.

    • Tuesday, August 2, 2022, 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday, August 3, 2022, 2-3 pm\

    50. The Lost World by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, published in 1912, introduces the “lost world” subgenre of sci-fi/fantasy adventure that was especially popular between the late nineteenth century and World War I. The eccentric Professor Challenger leads a scientific expedition deep into the Brazilian rain forest, joined by newspaper reporter Edward Malone, biologist Professor Summerlee, and adventurer Lord John Roxton. Eager to investigate Challenger’s controversial claims that there are living dinosaurs in South America, the explorers soon discover the truth-and the danger-of this strange land for themselves. Trapped on an isolated and precipitous jungle plateau, they must survive prehistoric perils if they ever hope to return to the outside world.

    Read on Hoopla or Project Gutenberg, listen on Hoopla (about 8.5 hours) or an alternate recording. Watch the 20012-part miniseries movie with Peter Falk, Bob Hoskins, Patrick Dempsey and Elaine Cassidy on Hoopla. Watch the 1925 silent film The Lost World, which has been deemed culturally, historically or aesthetically significant” by the Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry. Watch on Hoopla. Check out the book from the library.

    • Tuesday August 30, 2022 7-8 pm
    • Wednesday August 31, 2022 2-3 pm

Lissa Staley helps people use the library. She is a Book Evangelist, Trivia Emcee, Classics Made Modern book discussion leader, NaNoWriMo Municipal Liaison, and frequent library customer. She loves her kids, being a librarian, living in Topeka, and helping people form connections and community. (She's the Community Connections Librarian!) She reads a new book every few days, but is enjoying the audiobook of "Empress of Forever" by Max Gladstone, the ebook "When We Were Magic" by Sarah Gailey and is eagerly awaiting John Scalzi's "The Last Emperox" in April!