And the winners are…

We are proud to announce the “juror’s award” winners for Printed Image 6.

Each year we select a juror for our printmaking competition. This person is an expert in the field and has the very hard (yet rewarding) job of selecting the work on display in the gallery from all those submitted. The juror is allowed to pick pieces that stand out to them and give them a monetary award. Some years there is just 1 winner, others years there have been as many as 5. This year our juror Stephen Goddard chose 3 wonderful prints: Beautiful Monster, I Forgot, and Lighting Triptych. Here is what Steve had to say about these prints.

Beautiful Monster, Gordon Sherman

Gordon Sherman, Beautiful Monster, mixed print

Gordon Sherman, Beautiful Monster, mixed print

Beautiful Monster, described as a “mixed print,” seems to push the limits of combined printmaking processes while remaining coherent. That it is, the multiple methods employed don’t result in a fractured statement or composition, which can so easily happen when an artist pulls out all the technical stops. There is a brooding sense that dark issues are just below the surface of this work that, while evident, are hard to identify, making the act of looking an act of thinking and reflection as well.

I Forgot, Kim Morski

Kim Morski, I Forgot, reduction print

Kim Morski, I Forgot, reduction print

I Forgot is a wonderfully enigmatic print. Earth, or is it a devastated landscape, with words carved into it indicating an idea or memory now lost or removed, a celestial object near the horizon, sun, moon, rising, setting? The mind tinkers with these clues and an ecological crisis seems to tug the hardest and our attempts to find meaning.

Lightning Triptych, Lisa Grossman

Lisa Grossman, Lightning Triptych, relief-roll woodcut on silk tissue, on mulberry, on panel

Lisa Grossman, Lightning Triptych, relief-roll woodcut on silk tissue, on mulberry, on panel

Lightning Triptych wonderfully captures that experience of viewing lightning strikes in a Midwestern thunderstorm. I think this is because the technique, which involves rolling images off of a brayer with slight variations with each roll, has a temporal quality to it. This effectively captures the anticipation of wondering where the next strike will occur, and then of seeing it, followed by a sort of afterimage. In sum, Lightning Triptych is a great alignment of technique and content.

Attend Printed Image Nov4 – Dec 30

 

 

Zan Popp

Hello, I'm your friendly neighborhood Curator of Exhibitions. I have the amazing job of creating, building and presenting wonderful art exhibits for you at the library's Alice C. Sabatini Art Gallery.