52 for 150: What’s So Special About Your Library’s Trade Card Collection?

It’s week 28 of our Kansas sesquicentennial video series and we’re taking a closer look at our Trade Card collection. Trade cards were an early form of advertising and marketing and have existed since the early 17th century. Made from paper, these handouts contained information about a business’s location and the goods it offered. They can also reveal the era’s cultural values. “During the height of popularity for the chromolithographic trade card, from 1880-1900, popular culture was an inspiration for many of the designs.”

52 for 150: What’s So Special About Merrell Gage?

Happy Independence Day, America! For week 27 of our Kansas sesquicentennial video series we’re taking a closer look at Topeka native and renowned artist, Merrell Gage (1892-1981), “an alumni of the most sophisticated art schools, who turned for subject matter to the basics of American history, the stories of the western struggle, and the lives of heroes of the American soul. Gage portrayed and interpreted the freedom and dignity of the American experience through the medium of his art.”

52 for 150: What’s So Special About Robert Sudlow and Horace Eubank?

We’re well into Kansas summer with its inescapable geographic beauty, so for week 26 of our Kansas sesquicentennial video series we’re honoring the memories of renowned Kansas landscape artist, Robert Sudlow (1920-2010) and one of his most devoted patrons and generous TSCPL benefactor, Horace Eubank (1918-2005).

52 for 150: What’s So Special About Your Library’s Ceramic Arts Collection?

Walking out of the house today feels like stepping into an oven. Kansas summers are hot, but kilns are hotter, some reaching 2000 degrees fahrenheit. In keeping with the heat and oven theme, week 25 of our Kansas sesquicentennial video series is all about our Ceramic Arts Collection.

52 for 150: What’s So Special About Birger Sandzén?

It’s summer and perfect weather for an afternoon drive through the Kansas countryside. Why not pack a lunch, grab your sketchbook or camera and document the landscape like our featured artist for week 24 of our Kansas sesquicentennial series, Birger Sandzén (1871-1954).