Why Read in the Summer

JuneJuly2013LibraryNewspg7Keep kids reading all summer long for maximum payoffs when they return to school in the fall. Our Summer Reading program is set to sync with Topeka Public School’s “iRead 20” program. Our program has been set with vacation, ball games, swim lessons and lazy days in mind. It’s so easy to read this summer. Sign up here.

“It’s best to schedule it. Implement bedtime stories or some other story time and stick to it,” said Darcy Kraus, language arts consulting teacher at USD 501. “Use downtime to read. For instance, use your time with kids in the car to point out letters and words in the environment.”

Kraus spearheaded the “iRead 20” reading program, which during the school year encourages students to read 20 minutes a day outside the classroom. The library’s reading time tracker is set to 20-minute reading intervals too.

LOGO iRead20 RGB“Research indicates that 20 additional minutes of reading per day correlates with significant gains for all learners. However, any amount of additional time allocated to literacy proves beneficial at all levels,” Kraus said. “iRead 20 is our proactive approach to preparing students for more rigorous Common Core State Standards that will begin being assessed in the 2014-15 school year.”

Reading practice during summer ensures that your child heads back to school maintaining or improving reading skills, according to our multi-year study of summer reading’s effectiveness on test scores. Great reading skills are not only important in school, but also an integral part of everyday life!

Parents, pull out the time tracker in the center spread of this edition of Library News or sign up and start tracking at summerfest.tscpl.org. Library cards are not required. Reading programs are only the tip of the iceberg to grow the next generation of readers. It takes the whole community, and it will be better for the whole community because as studies show better readers are more civically engaged, Kraus said.

A public relations professional, editor and writer, Lisa shares the library story in her blog posts, in the bimonthly Library News, and media interviews. A self-described social media and news nut, Lisa harnesses that passion to raise awareness and understanding of the library's vital role in this community.