Journaling with words and images: Monthly Workshop

Our monthly journaling workshop offers ideas and encouragement for people pursuing personal writing with words and images. The tips and ideas shared by participants in our first few meetings are archived here. The workshop meets on the second Tuesday of each month at 10:00 am at the library. Everyone is welcome to attend and participate.

Upcoming topics

  • Apr 10: Growth & Gardens
  • May 8: Art, Light & Illumination
  • Jun 12: Travel & Exploration
  • Jul 10: Focus on Nature
  • Aug 14: Collages: Images & Words
  • Sep 11: Doodles & Lists
  • Oct 9: Capture the moment: Watercolor & Imagery
  • Nov 13: Thanks, Giving & Gratitude
  • Dec 11: Busy Lives & Reflection

 Knowledge Shared by Participants

  • Writing letters, and writing thank you notes, is a form of shared journaling. The book 365 Thanks Yous: The Year a Simple Act of Daily Gratitude Changed my Life by John Kralik is particular instructive and inspiring on this topic.
  • A newsy Christmas or holiday letter, saved each year, creates an annual history of a family
  • Some people journal about family history in order to gift those memories to children or grandchildren
  • Some people may journal for themselves only, labeling their personal journals “Burn this when I die” to differentiate that writing from anything meant to be shared
  • Personal journaling may inspire you to do other things like letter writing, short story writing, or creating a family cookbook
  • When you think about journaling specifically for someone else (example: a grandchild) it changes what you choose to write down
  • Writing letters to people (example: grandchild) for them to receive at a date in the future can help focus your journaling for another person
  • Writing down the cute things that a child said or did can be a wonderful gift for the future
  • The challenge is to write things down when you think about them, don’t try to be perfect about it.
  • You can mine your journals later for short story or painting or poetry ideas
  • Labeling your photos is valuable; it still might be worth it to write the story of a old photo now, while you still remember it
  • When you are having a very bad day, checking wikipedia.org for the “This Day in History” link can give you some perspective
  • Practicing validation can be worthwhile and powerful in daily life

Recommended books

The monthly workshop “journaling with words and images” meets on the 2nd Tuesday of each month at 10 am at the Topeka and Shawnee County Public Library.

Lissa Staley

Lissa Staley helps people use the library. She is a Book Evangelist, Health Information Librarian, Arts & Crafts Librarian, Trivia Emcee, Classics Made Modern book group leader, and frequent library customer, especially with her children. She reads a new book every few days, but recently loved Adorkable by Sarra Manning, Fortunately the Milk by Neil Gaiman and Tin Star by Cecil Castellucchi.